Living on a budget

Kate Carpenter, The Kentucky Kernel

Moving into your own apartment or house is often a college student’s first experience with handling money. Below are some tips on how to save.

  1. Make sure you know how much your rent is, and whether utilities are included. If they aren’t, you are in for a depressing surprise the first month.
  2. Before you sign up for a cable or internet provider, make sure you shop around. Much of the time, if you get cable and internet, it is a packaged deal.
  3. Create a monthly budget. Factor in how much money you make a month, then subtract what you will be spending that month, whether it’s on clothes, entertainment, food or utilities. Keep it in view each day so you aren’t tempted to spend money on something that isn’t calculated in the budget.
  4. If you pay for your utilities in your apartment, turn the lights off when you leave. Turn off the TV, turn off anything electronic. It will save money in the long-run. The same goes for water. Keep showers short and you will save money on your water bill as well.

The Search Is On: Finding A Roommate

by Kate Carpenter

Finding a roommate or many roommates doesn’t have to be a drawn-out, painful experience. All you have to do is use your resources.
When attempting to find a roommate, there are many factors you should look at.
Picking a person you have known for a long time can be a good place to start. Make sure you truly know the person before you make the decision to move in with them. This involves many aspects. Are they reliable? Are they a night owl or a morning person? Are they a partier or more laid back? Do not automatically assume you will get along with a person just because you are friends. Living with someone is much different than having a friendship with someone.
If you are from out of town or haven’t made many roommate-quality friends, looking in the classifieds of newspapers is another option. In the Kentucky Kernel, there are people at UK looking for roommates all the time. Before you make a deal with the devil make sure to get to know the people you might move in with. You don’t want to be unhappy with your decision.
If you are a freshman or you live in the dorms, your quest for the perfect roommate may be right under your nose. Get to know the people in your dorm, and if you have a random roommate or one you have known, ask yourself if you could see yourself moving off-campus with the person.

Furnishing a new apartment

 

Joy Priest

The walls of my room are decorated with emptiness and strategically placed certificates that suggest I’m “accomplished” — a substitute for a deficiency in true home interior design. Décor is nonexistent in my drab abode, primarily due to an absence of funds.

Hey, I’m a college student … and you are too. So, maybe you suffer with this same predicament. Well, the Kernel Entertainment Guide decided to go searching for some decoration deals that may satisfy your budget, or lack thereof.

First up is Room Service, Inc., a local consignment shop with up to 9,000 square feet of space to drop off your furniture pieces on consignment for some extra cash. On the other hand, if you’re patronizing to purchase, Room Service sells gently used furniture and even has a layaway option to accommodate a smaller budget.

“Prices are marked down regularly … and we play the best music in Lexington,” roomserviceinc.com boasts.

Another option is Another Man’s Treasure, a 20-year-old furniture business in Lexington sure to meet your furniture needs with new, used, antique and closeout furniture.

“A lot of college students come in when they are moving into their apartments in the summertime and sell to us when they’re graduating and moving off, and we buy outright,” said Dottie Gibbs, the store’s owner.

Buying outright means students moving out of apartments with furniture still sitting around can call Another Man’s Treasure, agree on a price and have a scheduled pick up at no cost. This is a convenient option students can consider during a last-minute frenzy.

Getting to Campus

By: Kate Carpenter, The Kentucky Kernel

Getting to campus can become quite the complicated process if you don’t know where to look.
But, have no fear. I have your back. When you break down the different ways you can get to campus, there are only about four logical ways. One way is taking the bus. A second is to bike. A third is to drive. A fourth is walking.
LexTran offers a bus route that stops in 25-minute intervals at University Courtyards Apartments on Nicholasville Road and any other LexTran bus stop on the route. This service, fittingly named the “True Blue Express,” runs Monday through Friday from 6:50 a.m. to 2:20 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 6:15 a.m. You can either buy a pass or pay the fare. A 30-day unlimited pass for adults is $30, a 20-ride punch pass is $15, or a class pass is $50 per semester or $75 for the school year.  The regular adult fare is $1. The student fare is $.80, with your student ID of course.
Biking, just like driving, is regulated on UK’s campus. If you have a bike on campus, you need a bicycle permit.  The permit is free of charge and is available online or at Parking Structure no. 5 or no. 6. If you choose to ignore the fact you need to get a permit, your bike could be impounded.
Driving to campus is a third option. Paying for parking through the university is one way to do it. Parking permits are available at the beginning of the school year and are sold until they run out. If you live at least one mile off campus and have at least 60 credit hours, you can buy a commuter pass. The commuter pass is $124 per semester, or $248 per year. On campus, meter parking is also available. These meters have either 45-minute or three-hour limits, and are controlled 5 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.
If you want to park for free on campus, start early. On streets such as Maxwell, Transylvania, Woodland and Linden Walk, parking on the street is available. But paying attention to the signs is a must. For example, on Maxwell, you cannot park there on the first Wednesday of the month because of street cleaning. And you also must be extremely talented at parallel parking.
The last option is walking. But in cold or rainy weather, we all know this may not be the best choice.

Possession Protection

By: Allyn Proffitt, The Kentucky Kernel

Have you ever thought about how you would replace all of your belongings if someone broke into your apartment or if your apartment caught on fire?
If not, you should check out renters insurance. If something happened, how would you replace thousands of dollars’ worth of personal belongings?
“Renters insurance is a great thing to have — its inexpensive and covers all of your possessions, including not just stuff in your apartment, but also in your car and even stuff you may have in storage,” State Farm Representative Emily Earlywine said.
Don’t think you have enough property to insure? When you add up the value of your TV, laptop, furniture, jewelry, cell phone and wardrobe, you have more to insure than you think. What about collectibles? They all add up.
Have you heard that renters insurance is expensive? Guess what? It isn’t. For less than a dollar a day, you can insure your belongings from any damage that may occur to them.
Do you think that your landlord’s insurance covers you? It doesn’t. Typically a landlord’s insurance only covers the building in which you live, not your own possessions within the apartment.
However, Earlywine said if you are cooking something and accidentally start a fire, you are responsible and liability insurance, something generally included in a renter’s policy, will cover the damage.
Even if you think you or your roommates will never catch the house on fire, did you think about what your neighbors might be doing? What if they leave a candle burning and it starts a fire on their side of the building? If you have renters insurance, your lost possessions will be covered.
If you don’t have renters insurance, you can call or visit the numerous insurance agencies, such as State Farm, Kentucky Farm Bureau and Allstate for a quote. You can also check online to see if your insurance company offers renters insurance. Rates may vary based on circumstances such as the age of your apartment whether you already have insurance through that company.

Laundry tips you wish your momma had told you sooner

By: Joy Priest, The Kentucky Kernel

Splash ’Em Out Wash ‘n’ Fold Coin Laundry has two convenient locations in Lexington, one of which is located right near campus on Waller Avenue. However, this particular laundry service doesn’t even require your presence to get your clothes clean. They provide pick-up service for their customers.
“We actually come and pick up people’s laundry and drop it back off as long as you are in the Lexington area,” said Opal Atkins, a Splash ‘Em Out employee. “We do UK Plus Account and we do have an ATM machine now as well.”
Splash ’Em Out, which provides same-day service, is the perfect laundry help for a struggling, stressed out student. Not only do they provide laundry delivery, but they accept the most popular campus currency: Plus Account.
Although Splash ’Em Out has affordable prices, they still may land just a little bit above your financial resources. So the Kernel Entertainment Guide is providing you with our version of “doing laundry.”
HOW-TO

1) Separate your colors. Last time I Googled, tie-dye was only fashionable in the 60s and 70s. So, you want to be careful of what colors you wash together so as not to have the “tie-dye effect.”

  • Dark clothing, such as blue jeans and blacks in one pile.
  • Whites sectioned off all alone.
  • Reds (these can go with darks if it’s not a valuable/expensive material)
  • And finally, whatever is left, i.e. your “lights” (teals, yellows, pastels, light greys, etc.)

2) Once you have your piles or “loads” separated, place one of them in the washer. In another attempt to skip the tie-dye effect, each load needs to be washed in a certain temperature.

  • Darks    ~    COLD water
  • Whites ~    HOT water
  • Red    ~    COLD water
  • Lights ~    Warm water

If you didn’t pick up on it, there is a pattern here. The darker the material is the lower or colder the water temperature should be.
3) Whites that are completely white can be bleached to conserve brightness.
4) After washing each load, place it in the dryer on an energy level that corresponds to the value of material.

  • Cotton – regular or high heat; delicates – low heat

Toolbox essentials for your home

By: Kate Carpenter, The Kentucky Kernel

Each apartment or house should have access to a toolbox for general home improvement tasks.

  • Hammer- Needed to hang pictures. Only need a small one.
  • Nails- Needed to hang pictures. Get small ones to minimize damage on walls.
  • Putty knife- When moving out, you can’t leave the holes on the wall from nails. So fix the holes with putty and a putty knife.
  • Screwdriver- Makes putting together a desk much easier.
  • Push pins- To hang up all those posters.
  • Pliers- Used for adjusting many assorted items, whether you are loosening or tightening something.
  • Extension cord- Necessary for all of your electronic needs. You will be surprised how many things you own need to be plugged in.
  • Painters tape- If you are painting your room, make sure to put tape around the edges to reduce stains you don’t want.
  • Duct tape- Enough said. The other day I used duct tape to fix my windshield wiper. It’s an amazing product.
  • Flash light- In case of a power outage, always good to have. Make sure the batteries don’t go bad.

It’s moving day!

Moving into your own apartment or house is often a college student’s first experience with handling money. Below are some tips on how to save.

  • Make sure you know how much your rent is, and whether utilities are included. If they aren’t, you are in for a depressing surprise the first month.
  • Before you sign up for a cable or internet provider, make sure you shop around. Much of the time, if you get cable and internet, it is a packaged deal.
  • Create a monthly budget. Factor in how much money you make a month, then subtract what you will be spending that month, whether it’s on clothes, entertainment, food or utilities. Keep it in view each day so you aren’t tempted to spend money on something that isn’t calculated in the budget.
  • If you pay for your utilities in your apartment, turn the lights off when you leave. Turn off the TV, turn off anything electronic. It will save money in the long-run. The same goes for water. Keep showers short and you will save money on your water bill as well.